Things to Consider Before Eloping

Having a wedding is a huge expense and that is why some people choose the less expensive option and elope. However, there are a few things to keep in mind, legally, if you and your significant other are thinking of eloping. Read on for our guide to eloping, legally, that is.

Age
Most states require that each spouse be at least 18 years old to marry. Even though some states will allow minors to marry under certain circumstances, the legal age to marry is in most states is 18; at 16 you can, in most states, marry with parental consent.

Witnesses
You must get someone to officiate the ceremony, such as a court clerk, a clergy person, or anyone that is authorized to do so. For example, there are many chapels in Vegas that are staffed with authorized personnel to perform wedding ceremonies legally.

Paperwork
You will need to obtain a marriage license before you elope–this is what will make your marriage legal. Check with your particular state because each state has different requirements for obtaining a marriage license. Some states require that both spouses are there and present identification, and some states will even put a wait time of up to 5 days before you can get your license.

Cost
Although eloping is a much less expensive alternative to a big luxurious wedding, there are still some costs associated with eloping. A marriage license for example will cost you money; it varies by state, so double check.

Before eloping, you should also consider the things that may come after, such as divorce. It’s important to rethink certain decisions. If you’re thinking you can just quickly get married and then change your mind, think again. Courts will only grant annulments in certain circumstances, and your wild drunken marriage in Vegas might not be it.

If you’re thinking about elopement with you significant other or have recently eloped and need a divorce attorney, please give our law firm a call at 414-259-9300. We represent divorce clients in Wauwatosa, WI and surrounding Wisconsin areas including Milwaukee, Waukesha, Ozaukee, Washington, Racine and Kenosha Counties.

Posted on: Tuesday, April 19th, 2016
Categories: Divorce